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Conventions used in this manual

The conventions used in this manual are not strict ones. However we do observe a few general rules:
  1. Words or lines that you might type on a computer (commands, filenames, names of C-language functions, and so are) are generally indicated in teletype font.
  2. When a function is described, the arguments which are inputs and those which are outputs (or those which are both) are indicated. Thus, for example the (fictional!) addition function
    add(int a, int b,int* c) which sets *c = a+b is described by:
    a: Input. One of the two integers that are added together.
    b: Input. The second of these integers.
    c: Output. Set to the sum of a and b.
    Note that technically this is incorrect, because of course in C even the ``output arguments" are really just inputs; they are pointers to an address in memory that the routine is supposed to modify. And technically, the statement that ``c is set to..." is not correct, since in fact it is the integer pointed to by c (denoted *c) that is set. However we find that this convention makes it much easier to read the function descriptions!
  3. Most of the time, the example programs using GRASP functions are given explicitly in the manual, so you can see the GRASP functions ``in use". Because these examples are illustrative, they are generally ``pared down" as much as possible (for example, default values of adjustable parameters are hard-wired in, rather than prompted for).
  4. Routines and example programs in GRASP generally begin with the line:
    #include "grasp.h"
    which includes the prototypes for all GRASP functions as well as the library header files stdio.h, stdlib.h, math.h, values.h, and time.h. The GRASP include file "grasp.h" can be found in the include subdirectory of GRASP.


next up previous contents
Next: How to add your Up: Introduction Previous: Stupid Pet Tricks   Contents
Bruce Allen 2000-11-19